WELCOME BACK!

The San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Zoo Safari Park are outdoor destinations and remain open. We continue to monitor the ongoing changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and are following the recommendations provided by our state and local health authorities.

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Panorama of a Safari Park field exhibit with giraffes, water buffalo, and rhinos

Greater One-horned Rhino

baby bear

YOUR SUPPORT IS VITAL TO OUR FUTURE

As we face the ongoing challenges of COVID-19, our team of dedicated specialists continue to care for countless animals and plants that depend on us each and every day.

Your continued support is critical to the wildlife in our care and vital to endangered species worldwide.

 

Greater One-horned Rhino

Many people describe these rhinos as armor-plated, but they are just covered with a layer of skin that has many folds. Greater one-horned rhinos are native to the humid, swampy areas of Northeast India and Nepal.

All rhinos enjoy a good soak in the mud. But for greater one-horned rhinos, this helps them get through times of high humidity, when insects can be a problem. Plus, that cool mud feels so good! Rhinos may often share a wallowing spot without any fighting, as if it’s neutral ground.

Greater one-horned rhinos were among the original animal species at the Safari Park when it opened to the public in 1972. The species is listed as Vulnerable on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. Today, we have the largest crash of rhinos and the most successful managed-care breeding program for rhinos anywhere in the world.

You can admire them up close during a Caravan Safari or Cart Safari!

Free! Living Legends - San Diego Zoo 100. Help save wildlife in our newest puzzle game.